Defence Today – February 2015 (PDF Download)

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In this edition:

COMBAT THUNDERSTORM, A NEW FORM OF AIR WARFARE
Future air warfare using a distributed network-enabled force

CHIEF OF AIR FORCE ADVOCATES INCREASED INVESTMENT IN AUSTRALIAN AIR POWER
Air Marshal Brown puts the case for new air platforms, advanced technologies and network-enabled forces

NEW LONG-RANGE STRIKE BOMBER TO REPLACE B-52
US Air Force banks on a new ‘B-3’ for its nuclear bomber force

IMPACT OF OPERATION OKRA IN IRAQ ON ADF FUTURE
Can RAAF combat operations be sustaine over an indefinite period

RAAF’S WEDGETAIL AEW&C COMES OF AGE, FINALLY
Airborne surveillance platform shows it’s now world class

COUNTERING THE EMERGING THREAT FROM ASIA
Impact of the emergence of China as the second Asian superpower

RAAF AIR POWER – A COHESIVE SOLUTION TO FUTURE THREATS
Transformation of Air Force into an agile and adaptive force

ENHANCED AIRLIFT ADDS TO ADF CAPABILITIES
C-17A Globemaster and KC-30A MRTT add significantly to Air Power support

ANZAC FRIGATE UPGRADE PROJECT SUSTAINS JOBS IN WESTERN AUSTRALIA
Harnessing the industrial strength of WA’s defence sector

ISIS AND THE THREAT TO HUMANITY WORLDWIDE
Dealing with ISIS without destroying freedoms in the process

Content:

In this special Australian Air Power edition of DefenceToday, to be distributed at the Australian International
Air Show at Avalon we profile the current state of Air Power in Australia. This is timely, given that six
F/A-18F Super Hornets have been flying combat missions over Iraq over the past four months; this
demonstrates how quickly things can change and why the Australian Defence Force needs to have the
capability to respond rapidly to constantly changing threats and military campaigns.
Chief of Air Force Air Marshal Geoff Brown has no doubt that “Air Power is t he most agile and most
responsive military instrument available to Government regardless of the nature of the operation.”
In a special report he outlines his reasons for making the case to Government for significant and ongoing
investment in platforms and technology assigned to Australian Air and Space power.
On a similar theme, Peter Layton examines the pathway to a Future Counter Air Force Structure for Australia
– the ability to wage a new form of air warfare, one that uses distributed forces all seamlessly exchanging
data and fighting as an integrated whole – producing a combat thunderstorm of air power.
In a special report military strategist David Kilcullen outlines events that gave strength to Islamic ‘State’
forces, and why the world needs to find ways to deal with this threat without destroying the free society
we seek to protect.
Heralded as the ‘aerospace program of the century’ the US Air Force’s Long-Range Strike Bomber will
replace the Cold War era B-52 bomber fleet. We look at the implications of this $50 billion program that
will also impact on which companies build combat aircraft in the coming decades.
New acquisitions in recent years, including Super Hornet, Wedgetail AEW&C, KC-10A Tanker Transport
and C-17A global airlifter have significantly increased air power capability – and new acquisitions (EA-18G
Growler and F-35A Joint Strike Fighter, will add more substance to the future network enabled force.
Separate reports analyse and outline the separate and collective effect these platforms and technologies
have on Australian Air Power.